Ubud Tours

Ubud Tours Package

pick up time : 09.00AM – 06.00PM | Only 599.000/Car (Max 6 persons)

Ubud tours package is MOST POPULAR ONE in Ubud area. Ubud is well known as the cultural and artistic heart of Bali, for a ‘must see’ destination for tourists visiting the island.

Surrounded by lush green landscapes and terraced rice fields it is a place where the Hindu philosophy is integrated as a way of life by its people and evidence can be seen in the form of traditional offerings and ceremonies.

It’s no wonder that travellers seeking peace, tranquility and a sense of spiritual fulfilment fall in love with Ubud.

Monkey Forest Ubud

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Monkey Forest Ubud

The Ubud Monkey Forest lies within the village of Padangtegal, which owns it. The village’s residents view the Monkey Forest as an important spiritual, economic, educational, and conservation center for the village. There are many of point of interest that you can see here. Other than around 700 monkeys, you also can see 186 species of trees in 12.5 hectares of forest, where will allowing you to get an abundant of fresh air.

The Sacred Monkey Forest of Padangtegal is owned by the village of Padangtegal. The village’s residents view the Monkey Forest as an important spiritual, economic, educational, and conservation center for the village. There are many of point of interest.

Tegalalang Rice Terace

Tegallalang Rice Terraces in Ubud is famous for its beautiful scenes of rice paddies involving the subak (traditional Balinese cooperative irrigation system). Tegallalang forms the three most splendid terraced landscapes in Ubud’s shared region. The Tegallalang rice terraces alone offers a scenic outlook that spreads down before you and away to the rice paddies on the slopes across the valley.

The high roadside location is cool and breezy and it is a well-known spot for tourists to stop and take photos. Painters and nature lovers also enjoy visiting this spot, and there are numerous art kiosks and cafes near the ledge offering their ware.

Luwak Coffee Plantation

The Coffee beans are taken from wild civet cat feces around coffee plantations. This coffee is different from other coffees, coffee beans taken from wild civet droppings. This wild weasel only chooses the best quality coffee cherries. make different flavors of coffee beans produced by the factory.

Elephant Cave Temple ( Goa Gajah)

Elephant Cave Temple – The temple is characterised by menacing faces that are carved into the stone – who’s purpose is assumed to be the warding off of evil spirits. The primary figure was once thought to be an elephant, hence the nickname Elephant Cave. Other sources state that it is named after the stone statue of the Hindu God Ganesh (characterised by having the head of an elephant) located inside of the temple.

To reach the entrance of the cave, you need to walk down a long flight of stairs. There is not an accessible entrance. The inside of the temple is small and usually has trails of white smoke from the incense burning. Visitors wearing shorts will be issued a sarong to tie around the waist before entering the courtyard.

Tegenungan Waterfall

Tegenungan Waterfall is one for nature lovers who happen to be staying in Ubud or have neighbouring Sukawati among their tour itineraries. The falls are conveniently located halfway between Ubud and Bali’s provincial capital of Denpasar. and is considered the closest natural attraction of its kind that you can reach within only a half-hour transfer southeast from Ubud town. Getting to the falls is a pleasant drive down paved village roads lined with stretches of green rice fields on both sides.

Upon reaching the end of the road, you are welcomed into a newly built parking and welcoming area, with ticket booths up front (tickets are IDR 10,000 or just under a dollar per person). This area is lined with art and souvenir shops, together with small local ‘warung’ stalls selling snacks and cold drinks.

The falls are only several minutes’ walk down the trail beyond the shops, where you’ll enjoy the impressively green valley panorama with cascading water as a centrepiece. Dense foliage frames the falls, and the water volume is impressive at almost any time of year, but normally at its strongest during the wet season (October to April).

You can go down to the vast pebbly base and enjoy a dip in the plunge pool, but this is not advised after heavy downpours, due to the risk of flash floods.

Gunung Kawi Temple

Gunung Kawi Temple complex. locally referred to as Pura Gunung Kawi, is one of Bali’s most unique archaeological sites. comprising a collection of ancient shrine reliefs carved into the face of a rock cliff. The main site overlooks the sacred Pakerisan River, which also flows by the Tirta Empul Temple a kilometre up north.

Across the river from the ancient reliefs is a temple courtyard featuring old Hindu shrines in a more contemporary architectural style. which is attended by pilgrims especially during its ‘piodalan’ temple anniversaries. Bali’s Pejeng region is famous for its rich collection of archaeological sites, and Gunung Kawi Temple is a popular stopover on itineraries through the central uplands of the Gianyar regency.

The temple complex is easily located, only a few hundred meters east from the Jalan Raya Tampaksiring main route, from where you continue down on foot to a paved walkway that is lined with art shops and small local warungs.

Along the further 300 steps towards the river, lush paddy terraces and gorgeously green valley go together to transport you back in time away from modernity. There is a similarly named temple, Gunung Kawi Sebatu.

Tirtha Empul Holy Water

Tirta Empul, Bali, is one of the largest and busiest water temples in Indonesia. The temple was founded in 926 A.D. and is dedicated to Vishnu, who is the Hindu god of water. The name of the temple actually means ‘holy water spring’ in Balinese.

Tirta Empul is located close to the town of Tampaksiring in the village of Manukaya. The village is a 30-minute drive to the north of Ubud. Tirta Empul is clearly signposted from the town of Tampaksiring. Unfortunately, the same cannot be said if you are coming cross-country from the village of Sebatu.

The entrance to Tirta Empul is set away from the main road. There’s a large car park in the front of the temple, which is always full of tour buses and cars. You will need to put on a sarong before you can enter the temple. You can rent a sarong for a small donation at the entrance to the temple.

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